Doctor Rennie's Blog

July 19, 2012

A comparison of topical steroid medications

shutterstock_47533036Many patients come into the clinic and are confused about steroid creams, ointments, lotions, sprays, foams, and gels.  They come in many different forms and vary in their degree of potency.  They are generally grouped into classes according to their strength.  The medical provider’s choice in prescribing  a particular topical steroid medication depends on many factors including the medical condition (ie. eczema, psoriasis, bee sting, allergic reaction, etc.) the location of the body that is being treated and of course the patient’s ability to afford the prescription.

There are some potentially harmful consequences that can occur if a steroid cream is used inappropriately.  For example, applying a high potency steroid cream to an area of the body such as the face or groin can cause permanent thinning of the skin.

Here is a list of the different classes or categories that topical steroids are grouped into:

Class 1:  Superpotent

Class 2:  Potent

Class 3:  Upper Mid-Strength

Class 4:  Mid-Strength

Class 5:  Lower Mid-Strength

Class 6:  Mild

Class 7:  Least Potent

Over the counter topical steroids are generally in the class 7 or least potent category.

Some examples of topical steroids and their respective classes include:

CLASS 1—Superpotent
Clobex Lotion/Spray/Shampoo, 0.05% Clobetasol propionate
Cormax Cream/Solution, 0.05% Clobetasol propionate
Diprolene Ointment, 0.05% Betamethasone dipropionate
Olux E Foam, 0.05% Clobetasol propionate
Olux Foam, 0.05% Clobetasol propionate
Temovate Cream/Ointment/Solution, 0.05% Clobetasol propionate
Ultravate Cream/Ointment, 0.05% Halobetasol propionate
Vanos Cream, 0.1% Fluocinonide
Psorcon Ointment, 0.05% Diflorasone diacetate
Psorcon E Ointment, 0.05% Diflorasone diacetate
CLASS 2—Potent
Diprolene Cream AF, 0.05% Betamethasone dipropionate
Elocon Ointment, 0.1% Mometasone furoate
Florone Ointment, 0.05% Diflorasone diacetate
Halog Ointment/Cream, 0.1% Halcinonide
Lidex Cream/Gel/Ointment, 0.05% Fluocinonide
Psorcon Cream, 0.05% Diflorasone diacetate
Topicort Cream/Ointment, 0.25% Desoximetasone
Topicort Gel, 0.05% Desoximetasone
CLASS 3—Upper Mid-Strength
Cutivate Ointment, 0.005% Fluticasone propionate
Lidex-E Cream, 0.05% Fluocinonide
Luxiq Foam, 0.12% Betamethasone valerate
Topicort LP Cream, 0.05% Desoximetasone
CLASS 4—Mid-Strength
Cordran Ointment, 0.05% Flurandrenolide
Elocon Cream, 0.1% Mometasone furoate
Kenalog Cream/Spray, 0.1% Triamcinolone acetonide
Synalar Ointment, 0.03% Fluocinolone acetonide
Westcort Ointment, 0.2% Hydrocortisone valerate
CLASS 5—Lower Mid-Strength
Capex Shampoo, 0.01% Fluocinolone acetonide
Cordran Cream/Lotion/Tape, 0.05% Flurandrenolide
Cutivate Cream/Lotion, 0.05% Fluticasone propionate
DermAtop Cream, 0.1% Prednicarbate
DesOwen Lotion, 0.05% Desonide
Locoid Cream/Lotion/Ointment/Solution, 0.1% Hydrocortisone
Pandel Cream, 0.1% Hydrocortisone
Synalar Cream, 0.03%/0.01% Fluocinolone acetonide
Westcort Cream, 0.2% Hydrocortisone valerate
CLASS 6—Mild
Aclovate Cream/Ointment, 0.05% Alclometasone dipropionate
Derma-Smoothe/FS Oil, 0.01% Fluocinolone acetonide
Desonate Gel, 0.05% Desonide
Synalar Cream/Solution, 0.01% Fluocinolone acetonide
Verdeso Foam, 0.05% Desonide
CLASS 7—Least Potent
Cetacort Lotion, 0.5%/1% Hydrocortisone
Cortaid Cream/Spray/Ointment Hydrocortisone
Hytone Cream/Lotion, 1%/2.5% Hydrocortisone
Micort-HC Cream, 2%/2.5% Hydrocortisone
Nutracort Lotion, 1%/2.5% Hydrocortisone
Synacort Cream, 1%/2.5% Hydrocortisone

This document is for informational purposes only, and should not be considered medical advice for any individual patient.  If you have questions please contact your medical provider.

 

I hope that you have found this information useful.  Wishing you the best of health,

Scott Rennie, DO

Blog: http://doctorrennie.wordpress.com

About these ads

2 Comments »

  1. Thanks. Very useful and handy list.

    Comment by A S — August 9, 2013 @ 10:22 am | Reply

  2. Exactly what I was looking for. Your list was easy to read and covered everything I wanted to know. Thank you.

    Comment by chi-one — September 2, 2013 @ 4:45 pm | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Rubric Theme. Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 38,868 other followers

%d bloggers like this: